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COVID-19 vaccine could put cold-storage logistics to the test

Courtesy of The Post and Courier

News last week that a COVID-19 vaccine has shown a 90 percent success rate in testing has buoyed hopes that the coronavirus pandemic might soon be under control, but getting that vaccine to patients promises to be a logistics challenge.

The vaccine, developed by Pfizer Inc., has to be stored at temperatures of at least minus-94 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s approaching the lowest temperatures at the South Pole.

It’s also much lower than the temperatures experienced in typical cold-storage logistics. The refrigerated cargo containers that move through the Port of Charleston can achieve temperatures of below-30 Fahrenheit, but that fluctuates during summer months when outside temperatures are climbing. The coldest refrigerated container built by industry leader Thermo King can reach minus-76 Fahrenheit, but that’s still not cold enough for vaccine storage.

Read the PandC’s full story here.

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Tamia Sumpter

Tamia is a driven senior undergraduate Bioengineering student currently enrolled at Clemson University. With a strong foundation in her field, she has honed her skills through hands-on experience in research and development at Eli Lilly & Company. During her time in the ADME department, Tamia contributed significantly by working on siRNAs and their applications in finding In Vitro-In Vivo Correlation (IVIVC). Looking ahead, Tamia has set her sights on a promising career in law. She aspires to specialize in Intellectual Property Law, with a particular focus on serving as in-house counsel for leading medical device or pharmaceutical companies. Her enthusiasm for this role is palpable as she prepares to embark on her legal journey! She is also a proud member of the Omicron Phi chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., PEER Mentor for Clemson PEER/WiSE, and currently serves as the President of Clemson Bioengineering Organization (CBO). With her unique blend of scientific knowledge and legal interests, Tamia is poised to make a meaningful impact in the healthcare and life sciences industries.