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  • sam patrick posted an article
    SCBIO, business community shaping curriculato grow life sciences careers see more

    Compliments of GSA Business and SCBIZ

    South Carolina’s life science sector creates twice as many jobs as the average of all other sectors in the state economy, according to a recent study, but whether it can fill those positions is another matter — especially in the manufacturing and logistics side of the house.

    The life science fields are struggling to fill positions in the fast-growing sector. (Photo/Provided)

    “It has historically been the majority of the time that you find a qualified person, they already have a job in M&L (manufacturing and logistics), so it has really been tough to fill the need,” said Josh Turner, a sales executive for Modjoul, a health-focused data analytics company that serves the manufacturing sector. Turner is also a former staffing professional.

     He added that staffing companies pre-pandemic were filling positions with available people even if they weren’t trained or had any experience in the field.

    “All I’ve heard since the pandemic is [that] it has been hard to even find available people, much less available and qualified people,” he said.

    This gap is even more prominent in a life science field that sometimes requires more than the standard specialization or training. And to add insult to injury, few in-school training programs target this unique brand of manufacturing and logistics, said SCBIO interim CEO Erin Ford.

    “The life sciences encompasses so many aspects from medical devices to pharmaceutical research and development to logistics in getting the drugs or pharmaceuticals or medical devices to where they need to be,” she said. “There's just so many aspects to the life sciences. And we really, as a state, have not focused on having any specific curriculum or programs that are specialized in this area.”

    She argued that while the traditional medical careers such as nursing fall under the Life Science umbrella, industrial aspects of the sector often get overlooked in the classroom.

    “It’s just not even a part of the discussion as to what career you want to have,” Ford said.

    Arthrex and Tri-County Tech have had an existing apprenticeship partnership since 2020. (Photo/Provided)

    Since the economic development organization formed its Workforce Development Taskforce a few years ago, its more than 300 members have aimed to do something about that.

    She hopes that 2021 (or early 2022) will be the year she can see their work come to fruition through a curriculum pilot geared toward two-year students in South Carolina’s technical college network.

    Students upon learning about the field may often feel intimidated by the math or science components attached to a traditional science, technology, engineering and math field, she said, but really it’s the requirements of working in a clean room in the medical device field that can prove to be the most challenging.

    And that is the gap Ford hopes the program will fill.

    So far, Tri-County Technical College, Trident Technical College, Greenville Technical College and Midlands Technical College have signed on to the pilot, she said, which covers a track for pharmaceutical or biotech professionals and those seeking a career in the medical device field.

    “We don't want to reinvent the wheel,” Ford said. “That's why we're working with a lot of the partners to add in more substance for life sciences. So if we see that there is more for us to do, we will definitely take that on.”

    Life science companies in each region have already offered up some input to their needs and will continue to do so once the program launches: Trident Technical College has its ear to the ground for workforce demands of AlcamiCharles River Labs and Vikor Scientific while Tri-County Technical College is partnering with ArthrexAbbott Laboratories and Poly-MedMidlands Tech has an open channel to the demands of medical device companies Rhythmlink and Nephron Pharmaceuticals.

    “You’ve seen the map, right? Of the 700 life science companies? The kids just don’t know,” she told GSA Business Report, adding that it’s the job of SCBIO and its partners to share the story of the state’s abundance of life science firms and manufacturers.

    Medical device manufacturer Poly-med CEO Dave Shalaby said his company usually hires Clemson University graduates and has a strong in-house program, but now that the hiring climate has become so competitive in the Upstate, he has started to advise Tri-County Tech on courses that would expose students to the industry’s ISO 1345 standards and documentation.

    “And really surprisingly, it's not really geared toward the sciences as much as it's geared toward control, like how to control processes and design, and also there's a lot of statistics involved with showing proof that you're adhering to specific specifications that you've set,” Shalaby said. “So basically the course outline that we set up with Tri-County is to give them exposure to those sorts of things.”

    Tri-County instructors will teach company and industry requirements, he said, and help create a workforce pipeline to Poly-med, Arthrex and Abbott.

    “Tri-County is developing that curriculum now,” he said. “They’ve got sort of a draft in place, and it’s got to come back out for everybody to take a look at it and see if it makes sense to create the course.”

    The course would help prime students for employment at partnering industries like Poly-med, and Ford foresees a potential apprenticeship route on a case-by-case basis. SCBIO has been in conversation with Apprenticeship Carolina’s Carla Whitlock on those possibilities.

    In the meantime, Ford encouraged other industry voices interested in contributing to the program through input or partnership to get in touch and jump on board.

    “Reach out to us,” she said. “Reach out to me and SCBIO, because the more industry that we can have involved in these programs, the more successful it will be.”

  • sam patrick posted an article
    SCBIO, technical colleges stepping up for life sciences see more

    Compliments of GSA Business and SCBIZ News

    South Carolina’s life science sector creates twice as many jobs as the average of all other sectors in the state economy, according to a recent study, but whether it can fill those positions is another matter — especially in the manufacturing and logistics side of the house.

    “It has historically been the majority of the time that you find a qualified person, they already have a job in M&L (manufacturing and logistics), so it has really been tough to fill the need,” said Josh Turner, a sales executive for Modjoul, a health-focused data analytics company that serves the manufacturing sector. Turner is also a former staffing professional.

    He added that staffing companies pre-pandemic were filling positions with available people even if they weren’t trained or had any experience in the field.

    “All I’ve heard since the pandemic is [that] it has been hard to even find available people, much less available and qualified people,” he said.

    This gap is even more prominent in a life science field that sometimes requires more than the standard specialization or training. And to add insult to injury, few in-school training programs target this unique brand of manufacturing and logistics, said SCBIO interim CEO Erin Ford.

    “The life sciences encompasses so many aspects from medical devices to pharmaceutical research and development to logistics in getting the drugs or pharmaceuticals or medical devices to where they need to be,” she said. “There's just so many aspects to the life sciences. And we really, as a state, have not focused on having any specific curriculum or programs that are specialized in this area.”

    She argued that while the traditional medical careers such as nursing fall under the Life Science umbrella, industrial aspects of the sector often get overlooked in the classroom.

    “It’s just not even a part of the discussion as to what career you want to have,” Ford said.

    Since the economic development organization formed its Workforce Development Taskforce a few years ago, its more than 300 members have aimed to do something about that.

    She hopes that 2021 (or early 2022) will be the year she can see their work come to fruition through a curriculum pilot geared toward two-year students in South Carolina’s technical college network.

    Students upon learning about the field may often feel intimidated by the math or science components attached to a traditional science, technology, engineering and math field, she said, but really it’s the requirements of working in a clean room in the medical device field that can prove to be the most challenging.

    And that is the gap Ford hopes the program will fill.

    So far, Tri-County Technical College, Trident Technical College, Greenville Technical College and Midlands Technical College have signed on to the pilot, she said, which covers a track for pharmaceutical or biotech professionals and those seeking a career in the medical device field.

    “We don't want to reinvent the wheel,” Ford said. “That's why we're working with a lot of the partners to add in more substance for life sciences. So if we see that there is more for us to do, we will definitely take that on.”

    Life science companies in each region have already offered up some input to their needs and will continue to do so once the program launches: Trident Technical College has its ear to the ground for workforce demands of AlcamiCharles River Labs and Vikor Scientific while Tri-County Technical College is partnering with ArthrexAbbott Laboratories and Poly-MedMidlands Tech has an open channel to the demands of medical device companies Rhythmlink and Nephron Pharmaceuticals.

    “You’ve seen the map, right? Of the 700 life science companies? The kids just don’t know,” she told GSA Business Report, adding that it’s the job of SCBIO and its partners to share the story of the state’s abundance of life science firms and manufacturers.

    Medical device manufacturer Poly-med CEO Dave Shalaby said his company usually hires Clemson University graduates and has a strong in-house program, but now that the hiring climate has become so competitive in the Upstate, he has started to advise Tri-County Tech on courses that would expose students to the industry’s ISO 1345 standards and documentation.

    “And really surprisingly, it's not really geared toward the sciences as much as it's geared toward control, like how to control processes and design, and also there's a lot of statistics involved with showing proof that you're adhering to specific specifications that you've set,” Shalaby said. “So basically the course outline that we set up with Tri-County is to give them exposure to those sorts of things.”

    Tri-County instructors will teach company and industry requirements, he said, and help create a workforce pipeline to Poly-med, Arthrex and Abbott.

    “Tri-County is developing that curriculum now,” he said. “They’ve got sort of a draft in place, and it’s got to come back out for everybody to take a look at it and see if it makes sense to create the course.”

    The course would help prime students for employment at partnering industries like Poly-med, and Ford foresees a potential apprenticeship route on a case-by-case basis. SCBIO has been in conversation with Apprenticeship Carolina’s Carla Whitlock on those possibilities.

    In the meantime, Ford encouraged other industry voices interested in contributing to the program through input or partnership to get in touch and jump on board.

    “Reach out to us,” she said. “Reach out to me and SCBIO, because the more industry that we can have involved in these programs, the more successful it will be.”

  • sam patrick posted an article
    Over twenty experts to speak on major business issues see more

    Subject matter leaders from across state, nation to cover what business needs to know to thrive despite pandemic, how to leverage state’s fastest-growing knowledge economy segment

     

    SOUTH CAROLINA – September 2, 2020 – SCBIO will host a half-day virtual program September 23 -- Life Sciences Boot Camp: Building Your Brand & Business In a Pandemic – to inform and connect businesses, educators and professionals from across the state on leveraging opportunities, identifying trends and overcoming challenges that face organizations interested in tapping into South Carolina’s fastest-growing industry segment.

    To be held completely online, the program will run from 8:15 a.m. until 12:15 p.m. on Wednesday, September 23rd.  The program is delivered free to all SCBIO Members and Investors, and for a nominal fee of $50 to all non-Members.  Students and media may also attend free of charge.  Six sessions featuring over 20 noted presenters will precede a closing Virtual Networking Session for all attendees. Confirmed topics and speakers include:

    • Search for a Cure:  A National Update on the Global Pandemic – featuring a live national report from PhRMA executive Sharon Lamberton on success in battling the COVID-19 pandemic, and what lies ahead for America
    • Marketing in a Pandemic:  Building Your Brand & Your Topline – despite the economic turndown, some businesses are enjoying even great success – and are positioning themselves for an even better future.  Learn the secrets to thriving, not surviving, during and after the pandemic from Henry Pellerin of Vantage Point, Heather Hoopes-Matthews of NP Strategy and Jessica Cokins of Thorne Research
    • Best Practices in Talent Recruiting, Retention & Development – Nephron's Lou Kennedy, Arthrex's Jimmy Dascani and ERG's Matt Vaadi share how the state’s life sciences leaders are attracting, training and retaining top talent – and offer ideas your organization can deploy right now
    • Partnering Effectively with Higher Education & Research Universities – tap into the wealth of resources, knowledge and experience prevalent in the state’s  research universities to enhance innovation and success.  Enjoy insights from Chad Hardaway of USC’s Office of Economic Engagement, Michael Rusnak of MUSC’s Foundation for Research Development, and Angela Lockman of Clemson
    • Leading Virtual Teams Effectively – the pandemic has showed us that working virtually is here to stay.  Find out how to make your organization collaborate seamlessly, efficiently and effectively -- wherever your colleagues are located -- from Annie McCoy of ChartSpan, Andrew Collins of Alcami and Jenni Dunlap of Parker Poe
    •  Pivoting with a Partner:  Collaborating to Grow Your Business – learn how to successfully identify and partner with other organizations to expand and enhance product/service offerings.  Hear incredible stories from the teams at Zverse/Phoenix Specialty and Rhythmlink, ZIAN and MUSC as they share their stories -- and how you can find your next great opportunity.

     The program will end with a Virtual Networking session offering attendees to chat with leading economic development professionals including Stephanie Few of Womble Bond Dickinson, Tushar Chikhliker of Nexsen Pruet, and John Osborne of Good Growth Capital for conversations on Onshoring, Incentives, Accessing Capital and more.

    To register or for more details, visit the Events page.  Interested students and media members are invited to attend, with advance registration, at no cost.

    SCBIO is South Carolina’s investor-driven public/private economic development organization exclusively focused on building, advancing, and growing the life sciences industry in the state.  The industry has an $11.4 billion annual economic impact in the Palmetto State, with more than 675 firms directly involved and 43,000 professionals employed in the research, development and commercialization of innovative healthcare, medical device, industrial, environmental and agricultural biotech and products.  The state-wide nonprofit has offices in Greenville, Columbia, and Charleston, and represents companies in the advanced medicines, medical devices, equipment, diagnostics, IT, and healthcare outcome industries.  Life sciences is recognized as the fastest-growing segment of South Carolina’s knowledge economy.

    For additional information on SCBIO, visit www.SCBIO.org.

     September 02, 2020
  • sam patrick posted an article
    Alcami's $17 million investment is expected to create 30 new jobs see more

     Alcami Corporation, a leading provider of fully-integrated custom end-to-end solutions for the pharmaceutical and biologics industries, today announced plans to expand the company’s current operations in Charleston County. The $17 million investment is expected to create 30 new jobs.

    Operating in North Charleston since 2001, Alcami offers a variety of solutions tailored to small and midsized pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies.

    Located at 4221 Faber Place Drive in North Charleston, S.C., Alcami will add approximately 6,000 square feet to the footprint of its facility, substantially augmenting the capacity of its sterile drug product development and manufacturing operations.

    The company’s expansion is expected to be completed in 2021. Individuals interested in joining the Alcami team should visit https://www.alcaminow.com/alcami-careers

    The Coordinating Council for Economic Development has approved job development credits related to the project.

    QUOTES

    “The build-out of our Charleston facility comes at a time of rapid growth for Alcami and represents a long-term commitment to our sterile drug product clients, our talented workforce and the greater Charleston area. Our clients expect the most advanced manufacturing technologies and capabilities, and this expansion will ensure we continue to exceed marketplace expectations by remaining on the forefront of industry needs.” -Alcami Site Director Darold Hill

    “When a company like Alcami Corporation continues to invest in our state and our people, it shows the businesses around the world that South Carolina is the place to be. We look forward to seeing this great company continue to grow and thrive for years to come.” –Gov. Henry McMaster

    “We’re excited to see the continued success of Alcami Corporation in Charleston County and the success of our state’s thriving manufacturing industry. We congratulate them on this newest announcement and the creation of 30 new jobs.” –Secretary of Commerce Bobby Hitt

    “The growth of Alcami Corporation during its 18 years in North Charleston has been truly remarkable. This company is a highly-valued corporate citizen, and with this expansion, it is renewing its steadfast and long-standing commitment to our community.” –Charleston County Council Chairman Elliott Summey 

    “We applaud Alcami’s accomplishments in our local economy, building upon their company’s innovation, which is backed by a proven workforce. North Charleston remains ripe for businesses to flourish, and we are always grateful for the benefits our community receives when companies succeed.” –North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey

    “Congratulations to Alcami on announcing their second expansion in Charleston County in the last three years. Assisting local companies in their expansion efforts is a primary focus of our Business Concierge program. Our long-standing relationship with Alcami helped support their decision to grow their global footprint at their North Charleston facility.” –Charleston County Economic Development Executive Director Steve Dykes