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Greenville Health System

  • sam patrick posted an article
    Greenville Health System and Palmetto Health will come together under a single brand in 2019 see more

    Greenville Health System and Palmetto Health will come together under a single brand, sharing a new name and logo, in early 2019.

    As part of the new identity, the GHS, Palmetto Health and Palmetto Health-USC Medical Group brands, including their names and logos, will be retired. GHS and Palmetto Health will share a new purpose statement as well, which will replace current mission, vision and values statements. In addition, the interim name of the parent company, SC Health Company, will be replaced with the new name.

    But much will remain the same:

    · Patient care will always be the top priority for the organization. Together, GHS and Palmetto Health will continue to improve clinical quality, access to care and the patient experience, while also addressing rising health care costs.

    · Both the affiliates will continue their unwavering commitment to the communities they’re privileged to serve. 

    · The organization’s commitment to transforming health care through education and research will not change. From educational and clinical research initiatives to collaborating with our academic partners, the organization remains strongly committed to academics. We will continue to focus on educating the next generation of medical providers and investing in clinical research to improve the lives of those we serve.

    The new company name and logo will begin replacing the GHS and Palmetto Health names and logos in early 2019. However, campus and hospital names will retain their core name identities. Legacy hospital identities like Baptist, Greenville Memorial, Laurens, Richland and Tuomey will be included in the new names.

    The Palmetto Health-USC Medical Group will change its name and logo in late 2019.

    Coming together under one brand is a reflection of how GHS and Palmetto Health are focused on working together to improve the health of all South Carolinians. Both affiliates will continue to connect teams, tools, technology and education in an effort to make a lasting impact in the communities each has served for generations.

    More information about the new brand identity, including the name, logo and purpose statement, will be announced Tuesday, Sept. 25.  

  • sam patrick posted an article
    Study to investigate potential impact to outcomes for several difficult-to-treat solid tumors see more

    3D-PREDICT Study to investigate potential impact to outcomes for several difficult-to-treat solid tumors

     

    GREENVILLE, SC. – June 20, 2018 – KIYATEC, Inc. today announced the enrollment of the first patients in a U.S. clinical study of its Ex Vivo 3D drug response assay (EV3D™) across several difficult-to-treat solid tumors. The 3D-PREDICT clinical study has been initiated at the Cancer Institute of Greenville Health System (GHS) with the goal of recruiting 640 patients across additional clinical sites to be added in the future.

    The 3D-PREDICT Study is a prospective, open-label, multi-institutional, non-interventional study to validate the EV3D assay for clinical use and to investigate the impact on outcomes for cancer patients with both newly diagnosed and recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer and recurrent high-grade gliomas, which include glioblastomas (GBM). Over the next year or so, the study will expand to include patients with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas, high-grade rare tumors and triple negative breast cancer. The primary objectives of the study are to establish correlation between assay predicted drug response and patient clinical outcomes, and to measure the potential impact of the assay on therapeutic decision-making. The study is anticipated to continue through 2022. Details on the trial can be found on ClinicalTrials.gov

    The EV3D assay platform assesses a patient’s own cancer cells within a biologically relevant 3D culture microenvironment to provide individualized response prediction to specific therapeutic agents. In this study, the therapeutic agents predicted consist of available, guideline recommended drug options for each cancer type. 

    “As an institution, we’ve supported KIYATEC’s pilot clinical studies by providing over 450 samples of cancer tissues spanning the multiple tumor types they are testing and our clinical investigators are ready to take this important next step,” said Larry Gluck, MD, Medical Director of the GHS Cancer Institute. “Patients with recurrent ovarian cancer and recurrent GBM are among those with the most challenging prognosis at every cancer center around the country. The fact that KIYATEC is offering us a new tool in these very difficult to treat populations is a needle mover for these patients coming to Greenville for their treatment.”

    Patients with these kinds of newly diagnosed and recurrent cancers simply do not have the luxury of time on their side. Their time, health and money spent on a treatment that is not working can have devastating consequences that we all want to avoid,” said Matthew Gevaert, CEO of KIYATEC. “The commencement of this clinical trial builds upon the success of our pilot studies and represents a significant milestone toward our goal of helping cancer patients receive the best treatment at the earliest possible time.”


    About KIYATEC, Inc.

    KIYATEC is changing the future of cancer care by accurately predicting patient-specific response and non-response to chemotherapy drugs before treatment begins. Wasted time is the enemy of cancer patients and there is currently no way to accurately predict which cancer patients will respond to standard oncology treatments. KIYATEC has developed a validated process to use a cancer patient’s own live cells to accurately predict treatment response prior to beginning treatment.

     

    About Greenville Health System

    Greenville-based Greenville Health System (GHS) has partnered with Columbia-based Palmetto Health to form a not-for-profit health care delivery system serving 1.2 million patients annually across South Carolina. The new name and graphic identity are expected to be announced later this year. GHS offers patients an innovative network of clinical integration, expertise and technologies through its academic health system, eight medical campuses, tertiary medical center, research and education facilities, community hospitals, physician practices and numerous specialty services. GHS, by itself a 1,627-bed system, is home to 16 medical residency and fellowship programs, as well as partnership efforts such as the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville and the soon-opening Clemson University Center for Nursing, Health Innovation and Research. Visit www.ghs.org for more information.

  • sam patrick posted an article
    SCRA Collaboration Center Awards feature numerous life science organizations from across the state. see more

    South Carolina Research Authority’s SCRA-Academia Collaboration Team announces nearly $600,000 in feasibility grants for six projects. The awarded projects encourage collaboration between academic institutions and industry partners to advance commercially relevant research and establish the feasibility of the formation of Collaboration Centers. These Collaboration Centers will be founded for those areas demonstrating a critical mass of talent, infrastructure, financial resources, intellectual property and the prevalence of industry in South Carolina.

    “These Feasibility Grants are the first step in establishing Collaboration Centers, which will garner national recognition for South Carolina, create jobs, engage industry and have an overall positive impact on the state.” said Christine Dixon Thiesing, Director of Academic Programs. “SCRA is fostering the growth of collaboration across academic institutions and between academia and industry through the support of six innovation projects.”

    The Feasibility Grant Awards are the result of the efforts of the SACT, which was formed to deliver outcomes aligned with the Strategic Collaboration Agreement signed by SCRA and the presidents of the state’s research universities. The SACT is composed of representatives from the research universities, comprehensive teaching institutions, technical colleges, industry and SCRA. The SACT is currently evaluating the feasibility of establishing three Collaboration Centers – a Composites Industry Solutions Center, Medical Devices Collaboration Center, and Technology-Enabled Population Health Collaboration Center.

    The list of grant awardees is below:

    Composites Industry Solutions Center:
    Collaboration among Clemson University, Greenville Technical College and industry partners Kistler Instrument Corp., Keyence Corporation of America and Renishaw.

    Medical Devices Collaboration Center:
    Collaboration between the Medical University of South Carolina and Clemson University.

    Technology-Enabled Population Health Collaboration Center:
    Collaboration among the Medical University of South Carolina, Trident Technical College and industry partners Zeriscope, Inc. and Amanda Senior Care.

    Collaboration between Francis Marion University and a regional health organization as the industry partner.

    Collaboration among University of South Carolina – Upstate and industry partners ChartSpan Medical Technologies and a state agency.

    Collaboration among Clemson University, Florence-Darlington Technical College’s Southeastern Institute of Manufacturing and Technology and industry partner Greenville Health System.

  • sam patrick posted an article
    Clemson University ranks fourth among America's 50 best value schools for biomedical engineering... see more

    Clemson University came in fourth among the nation’s 50 best value schools for biomedical engineering, according to a new ranking from bestvalueschools.com.

    The ranking included a variety of factors, including graduation rate, accreditation date, degree popularity, engineering popularity and net price.

    Martine LaBerge, SCBIO Board Member and chair of the Department of Bioengineering at Clemson, said the ranking underscores that students are receiving a high-quality education that remains affordable.

    “Best Value Schools has done an impeccable job of describing our program,” she said. “The ranking is a result of our faculty’s hard work and dedication to giving our students not only the best-in-class instruction and experience but also great value.”

    The website advised students to “get ready to get hands-on at Clemson University.”

    “Just about every day at Clemson includes some type of laboratory study, research project, or side-by-side work with faculty,” according to the site.

    “Coursework doesn’t spare the details, either; the curriculum goes far beyond the basics to teach students about orthopedic implants, EKG simulations, medical treatment in developing countries, tissue engineering for human organs, and plenty of other topics that will immediately translate into the work environment.

    “And students don’t have to wait until graduation to test out their skills. International partnerships enable budding engineers to conduct research in Singapore, work with mentors in Japan, or study bioethics in Spain.”

    The department graduated 158 students last year, including 106 undergraduates, 37 master’s students and 15 doctoral students. It has 26 tenured or tenure-track faculty members conducting bioengineering research and clinically embedded education in partnership with the Greenville Health System and the Medical University of South Carolina.

    Citing numbers from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the website reported that demand for biomedical engineers will increase by nearly 25 percent  by 2024, which it says is much faster than the average occupation. The average salary for specialists in the field is more than $85,000 a year, according to the site.

    Clemson came in behind the Georgia Institute of Technology, Rice University, and the University of California-Irvine. The University of Utah rounded out the top five.

    Anand Gramopadhye, dean of Clemson’s College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences, congratulated the bioengineering department on the ranking.

    “This is a well-deserved honor that underscores the high return on investment our students receive,” he said. “The college will continue to offer access to top faculty, world-class facilities and enriching experiences, while ensuring investment returns remain strong for our students and their families.”

    To see the full list of rankings, go to: https://www.bestvalueschools.com/rankings/biomedical-engineering-degrees/