SCBIO

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    Biopharma research is an important source of jobs, tax revenue and research spending in SC see more

    New findings show biopharma research companies a source of jobs, tax revenue and research spending in state

     

    GREENVILLE, S.C., October 4, 2018 – This week, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) released a new report that finds there are more than 572 active clinical trials in the South Carolina, and the life science industry supports 29,500 high-quality jobs and contributes $7.9 billion to South Carolina’s economy. These clinical trials can be responsible for more than half of the $2.6 billion average cost of developing one new medicine. They are investigating some of the biggest health care challenges South Carolinians face, including arthritis, cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and Alzheimer’s disease.

    The report, titled “Research in Your Backyard: Developing Cures, Creating Jobs, Pharmaceutical Clinical Trials in South Carolina,” was released at a press event held at the Westin Poinsett today, which featured a panel discussion including researchers and executives from the Greenville Health System, KIYATEC, the Hollings Cancer Center at MUSC, and the Greenwood Genetic Center, moderated by SCBIO President and CEO, Sam Konduros.

    “Clinical trials offer patients novel medical treatments right here in the Palmetto State, while also allowing biopharma research organizations to innovate and grow,” said Konduros. “Across South Carolina, the life sciences and healthcare industries have had a profound impact on our economy and citizens, that continues to rapidly increase.”

    Clinical trials are a vital component of bringing new life-saving drugs and treatments to market. On average, it takes approximately a decade for new medicines to go through the rigorous Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval process. Only 12 percent of drugs successfully make it through clinical trials. Since 2004, biopharmaceutical research companies have conducted or are currently conducting more than 4,700 clinical trials in South Carolina. In 2013 alone, the nearly 1,100 active clinical trials in the state generated an estimated economic impact of $540 million.

    “One of the most important things we want people to understand about medicine development is that clinical trials rely on patient participation,” said Nick McGee, Director of Public Affairs for PhRMA. “It’s incredibly important that patients are aware of ongoing trials and learn how they can help become part of finding a cure for the toughest chronic conditions and diseases we face today.”

    In the United States, there are more than 7,000 open clinical trials being sponsored by the biopharmaceutical industry, universities, individuals and organizations combined. In South Carolina, of the 572 open clinical trials involving the biopharmaceutical research industry, the University of South Carolina Medial School is collaborating on more than 143 clinical trials and the Medical University of South Carolina is collaborating on more than 142.

    “Many top research and medical universities call South Carolina home and are centers of innovation,” Bob Quinn, Executive Director of the South Carolina Research Authority, said. “Maintaining strong partnerships between our universities and life science companies allows us to foster developments right here in South Carolina that can then help save lives far beyond our state lines.”

    You can read the complete report, “Research in Your Backyard: Developing Cures, Creating Jobs, Pharmaceutical Clinical Trials in South Carolina,” here.

    ###

    About PhRMA
    The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) represents the country’s leading innovative biopharmaceutical research companies, which are devoted to discovering and developing medicines that enable patients to live longer, healthier, and more productive lives. Since 2000, PhRMA member companies have invested more than $600 billion in the search for new treatments and cures, including an estimated $71.4 billion in 2017 alone.

    About SC BIO
    SCBIO is South Carolina’s investor-driven public/private economic development organization focused on building, advancing, and growing the life sciences industry in the state.  With an $11.4 billion annual economic impact in the Palmetto State, with more than 400 firms and 15,000 professionals directly involved in the research, development and commercialization of innovative healthcare, medical device, industrial, environmental and agricultural biotech and products that make a difference across the Palmetto State and around the world.  Visit us at SCBIO.org.

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    BIO global CEO Jim Greenwood, Over 50 National Speakers to Present at SCBIO 2018 see more

    Conference registrations soar with sell-out expected; CEOs and top industry leaders head to Charleston for strategic partnership development, industry insights

     

    SOUTH CAROLINA – September 26, 2018BIO global CEO Jim Greenwood will join more than 50 additional national speakers at SCBIO 2018 – the annual conference bringing top leaders and executives from life sciences organizations across the state and nation to Charleston, South Carolina October 23-25.

    Mr. Greenwood will address the gathering with a keynote presentation entitled “Global Perspectives for Life Sciences – Compelling Opportunity for South Carolina” the morning of the conference opening on October 24.  His presentation will be bracketed by two high-powered panel discussions – a feature panel comprised of top pharmaceutical executives entitled “Pharma’s Future in the Palmetto State and Beyond,” and followed by the Southeast US Economic Development Luncheon featuring an address by Secretary of Commerce Bobby Hitt.  The luncheon will be capped by a panel featuring life sciences economic development CEOs from across the Southeastern region.  Conference Chair and Womble Bond Dickinson partner Stephanie Yarbrough will moderate the luncheon panel.

    Scores of top industry chief executives, leaders in government and higher education, biotechnology and pharma executives, clinicians and researchers, and industry supporters from across America have already registered to attend SCBIO 2018 at Charleston’s Gaillard Auditorium, with registration already doubling the pace of 2017.  Among committed speakers and panelists are DePuy Synthes Global Orthopedic Leader I.V. Hall, Nephron Pharmaceuticals CEO Lou Kennedy, J.P. Morgan Executive Director of Healthcare Investment Banking Bell Zhong, MUSC President David Cole, USC President Harris Pastides, Siemens Healthineers North Americas President Dave Pacitti, and numerous others.

    Themed “Connect.  Collaborate.  Advance!” the 2+ day conference draws attendees from across America for networking, innovation updates, opportunity discovery, partnership making and strategic discussion.  Committed attendees include officials across a broad spectrum of life sciences industries including medical devices, bio manufacturing, drug discovery, pharmaceuticals, diagnostics and testing, digital health and health IT, bio ag  and more.  Space is limited and advance registration is still available at https://www.scbio.org/events/scbio-annual-conference.

    SCBIO is South Carolina’s investor-driven economic development organization exclusively focused on building, advancing, and growing the life sciences industry in the state.  The industry has an $11.4 billion economic impact in the Palmetto State, with more than 400 firms directly involved and 15,000 professionals employed in the research, development and commercialization of innovative healthcare, medical device, industrial, environmental and agricultural biotechnology products. 

    SCBIO 2018 kicks off Tuesday evening October 23 with an Opening Reception for conference registrants, speakers and sponsors at The Dewberry Hotel, presented by Explore Charleston and The Dewberry.  Wednesday will feature a complete day of sessions beginning at breakfast and continuing through a gala evening reception presented by Womble Bond Dickinson.  The conference will wrap up Thursday at lunchtime. 

    “The life sciences industry is a major driver of South Carolina’s economy, and this conference is testament to the industry’s growing impact, reach and rapidly rising economic significance in our state and region,” noted SCBIO President and CEO Sam Konduros. “Already accounting for thousands of highly-skilled jobs in the Palmetto State, this sector has tremendous growth potential, and we’re excited to showcase the top companies, research universities and leaders from across our state and country at SCBIO 2018.” 

    Among leading biotech and med-tech industry brands participating in the conference are Nephron Pharmaceutical, BIO, Johnson & Johnson, AVX, PhRMA, DePuy Synthes, Medpoint, AdvaMed, Poly-Med, VWR, Ritedose Corporation, Rhythmlink, SoftBox Systems, ZEUS, Patheon Thermo Fisher and more.  All of South Carolina’s research universities – MUSC, Clemson and the University of South Carolina – are represented, as are major healthcare systems, and economic development entities including the South Carolina Department of Commerce, SCRA, the Upstate SC Alliance, the Charleston Regional Development Alliance, Central Carolina Alliance and SiMT.

    As the official state affiliate of BIO -- the world's largest trade association representing biotechnology organizations – SCBIO members include hundreds of academic institutions, biotech companies, entrepreneurial organizations, service providers, thought leaders, economic development organizations and related groups whose members are leading the research and development of innovative healthcare, agricultural, industrial and environmental biotechnology products that transform how we heal, fuel and feed the world.

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    Despite ominous warnings and fearsome weather, Nephron Pharmaceuticals is stepping up again see more

    As Hurricane Florence bears down on the Carolinas, manufacturers are stepping up to help those impacted as best they can. South Carolina-based Nephron Pharmaceuticals, with a facility in West Columbia, SC, is providing assistance to the community in a unique way.

    Natural disasters can cause emergency drug shortages that can further impound the crisis. With that in mind, Nephron’s South Carolina facility is planning to remain open during the hurricane in order to guarantee a continuous supply of medications and other drugs in case of an emergency shortage.

    Read the full story here as reported by Shopfloor, the exceptional blog of our friends and allies at the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM)

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    Life sciences in South Carolina is big business -- and getting bigger by the day. Read why... see more

    In this article published simultaneously in Charleston Business Magazine, Columbia Business Magazine and Greenville Business Magazine, SCBIO CEO Sam Konduros paints a picture of the diversity of the rapidly-growing life sciences industry, and why the future is exceedingly bright -- and getting brighter -- as the $11.4 billion industry soars to new heights across South Carolina.

     

    Life sciences in South Carolina spans a diverse spectrum—from major pharmaceutical companies to globally known medical device companies.

    It encompasses start-ups and early stage innovation companies and embraces prestigious research universities and acclaimed health care systems employing some of America’s finest minds. It includes research and medical labs, bioscience-related distribution, even Bio-Ag tied to the state’s historical agricultural segment. Click to read complete article...

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    MUSC, Siemens Healthineers craft extraordinary agreement to advance healthcare see more

    The Medical University of South Carolina and Siemens Healthineers have formed a first-of-its-kind strategic partnership with the mutual goal of advancing the quality of health care in South Carolina. The partnership will capitalize on the coupling of MUSC’s clinical care, research and education expertise with Siemens Healthineers’ engineering innovations and workflow-improvement capabilities.

    “We are leveraging a longstanding relationship to reshape what we can both deliver in health care,” said David J. Cole, M.D., MUSC president. “Our nation is demanding that we address our fractured, costly and inefficient health care delivery systems. As the leading academic health sciences center in this state, MUSC’s purpose must be to drive the highest quality care for our patients at the lowest cost through commitment and partnerships. In discussions with the Siemens Healthineers team, we discovered a high degree of alignment with these concepts, and we are very excited to have them move forward with us. Our mutual goal is to not merely provide the best care possible for just our patients; we will define the new gold standard for others to follow.”

    Specifically, this new agreement will focus on driving performance excellence at MUSC and generating significant clinical and value-driven innovations in focused target areas including pediatrics, cardiovascular care, radiology, and neurosciences.

    “Ultimately, our goal is to enable health care providers to get better outcomes at lower cost. We will achieve that by empowering MUSC clinicians on this journey through four specific areas of focus – expanding precision medicine, transforming care delivery, improving the patient experience, and digitalizing health care,” said Dave Pacitti, president of North America for Siemens Healthineers. “These four core values of Siemens Healthineers are representative of the goals of our strategic relationship with MUSC, and we hope that the spirit of this flagship partnership will initiate a trend in value based care within the industry.”

     

    Read the entire article by clicking here.

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    Greenville, SC gains more accolades as a key cog in the state's emerging knowledge economy see more

    Greenville and South Carolina are in the national spotlight again as among America's emerging knowledge economy destinations.  SCBIO supporters Zylo Therapeutics, KIYATEC, VentureSouth and Chartspan are among the features companies in Bloomberg Businessweek's fabulous article.  Read on for the full story.

     

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    Eight story office and lab building named 22 WestEdge breaks ground in Charleston, SC see more

    The third multistory building set to rise in the developing WestEdge community on the Charleston peninsula broke ground Thursday — under a tent because of all the recent rain.

    The eight-story office and laboratory structure called 22 WestEdge will sit next to the under-construction, nine-story 10 WestEdge building at Spring Street and Lockwood Drive. That’s where Publix supermarket is set to open on the ground floor in October.

    The first floor of the all-glass exterior structure will house 15,750 square feet of retail space while the upper floors will provide 138,500 square feet of office space-targeted firms in the so-called knowledge economy, such as the life sciences industry. About half of the site has already been leased.

    Read on here for the full story from The Post and Courier.

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    MUSC topped its record for annual biomedical research funding with more than $276 million in FY2018 see more

    The Medical University of South Carolina has broken its own record as the state’s leader in garnering extramural funding for biomedical research. MUSC set a new high-water mark in FY2018, bringing in more than $276.5 million. The previous MUSC record for annual biomedical research funding was more than $259 million, set in FY2016. 

    “Being the state’s leader in biomedical research funding year after year is a significant accomplishment, and we applaud the passion and expertise of our dedicated scientists and their teams,” said David J. Cole, M.D., FACS, MUSC president. “Even so, reaching another record-breaking number is not an end in itself. The true impact of MUSC research is reflected in how we translate discoveries into new modalities of care and life-changing therapeutics. Research is a dynamic force that fuels how we fulfill our mission to lead health innovation for the lives we touch,” he added.

    Kathleen Brady, M.D., Ph.D., vice president for Research, called the accomplishment outstanding, especially during a period when being awarded research grant funding has become more intensely competitive than ever before. No other publicly assisted academic institution in South Carolina consistently garners near $250 million in research funding year after year.

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    SCHA has awarded funds to two South Carolina universities to support healthcare programs see more

    The S.C. Hospital Association has awarded the University of South Carolina and Clemson University $25,000 each to support the development of health care programs at the schools.

    USC will use the gift to its Department of Health Services Policy and Management in the Arnold School of Public Health to support students in its master’s of health administration program, while Clemson will use the money to create interprofessional clinical learning opportunities in its School of Nursing’s partnership with Greenville Health System, according to a news release.

    Additional funding may be provided after two years based on an annual review.

    “The SCHA scholarship will help the MHA program as it prepares students for positions to advance the provision of effective, efficient and equitable health services in South Carolina,” said Bankole Olatosi, director of USC’s master’s of health administration program. “Our students will benefit from the increased access to professional education available through conferences, meetings and training to complement their education. Such opportunities will also be used as a marketing tool for recruiting more talented future health administrators to South Carolina.”

    The scholarship program is funded by SCHA Solutions, a division of the hospital association that works with companies to provide services to state hospitals and health systems. Companies earn program endorsement by negotiating the best price for services and revenue sharing that support SCHA priorities, including workforce development.

    “We're grateful for the South Carolina Hospital Association's support of our efforts to ensure that our graduates are well-prepared,” said Kathleen Valentine, Clemson School of Nursing director. “Through these funds, students will have increased access to experts in the fields of interprofessional teamwork, continuum of care, population health and community health. We want to make students aware of career opportunities within hospitals and in communities that extend the rich contributions nurses offer to patients and families and enable nurses to thrive within their professional role.”

    Founded in 1921, Columbia-based SCHA advocates for the more than 70,000 workers employed in the state’s hospitals and health care systems.

    “SCHA recently completed on-site meetings with leaders of every hospital in the state to learn more about their issues and challenges. Topping the list was recruiting and retaining a quality workforce,” said Lara Hewitt, SCHA Solutions vice president for workforce and partner engagement. “That makes it our priority, and we're pleased to be able to award these grants to help prepare the next generation of health care staff.”

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    SCEDA Bill passage portends more opportunity for life sciences growth see more

    On Wednesday, October 3, the South Carolina House of Representatives overrode the veto of the SCEDA bill, S.1043, with a vote of 112-4. Passage of this bill shows the true team effort that SCEDA represents.

    “These important enhancements will add another arrow into our economic developers’ quiver when it comes to attracting professional jobs to South Carolina and supporting our local agriculture industry,” said Mark Warner, SCCED, SCEDA president and vice president of business development and marketing at Davis & Floyd. “We are grateful for the action of our South Carolina lawmakers and economic development professionals across our state who answered our call to action.”

    SCEDA would like to thank current SCEDA Legislative Committee chair, Stephanie Yarbrough, past Legislative Committee chair, Tushar Chikhliker, our current lobbyists, Sunnie Harmon and John DeWorken, past lobbyist, Sara Hazzard, and all the members who worked to create this legislation, called their legislator and encouraged them to vote and override this bill.

    “This is the culmination of years of collaboration by our state’s economic development sectors – both public and private – to respond to the ever-changing competitive landscape as we work to further diversify our state’s already robust economy,” said Tushar Chikhliker, SCEDA’s past Legislative Committee chair and an economic development lawyer at Nexsen Pruet.

    Please feel free to reach out to your legislator and thank them for voting to override the veto of this bill.  These changes will go into action immediately.


    Highlights of the bill are outlined below.

    Incentives for Professional Services / Office Jobs

    For professional services/office jobs, the changes below will encourage South Carolina to excel in all areas of economic development.

    •  Makes modifications to the State’s primary discretionary incentive, Job Development Credits (JDCs), for professional services/office jobs.

    •  Reduces job and wage thresholds applicable to qualified service-related facilities (QSRF) for the highest three tiers:

    • 125 jobs (down from 175) at a single location;
    • 100 jobs (down from 150) at a single location comprised of a building that has been vacant for at least 12 consecutive months; and
    • 75 jobs (down from 100) at a single location that pay more than 1½ times the lower of the state per capita income or per capita income in that county.

    •  Allows businesses engaged in legal, accounting, banking, or investment services to apply for JDCs. (Per the discretion of the Coordinating Council).

    •  Allows businesses engaged in retail sales to apply for JDCs as long as retail sales are not actually conducted at the facility.  (Per the discretion of the Coordinating Council).

    •  Suggests the Coordinating Council consider these factors in making a determination for qualification:

    • The percentage of the businesses’ annual gross receipts derived from outside of South Carolina for the previous 12 months and such percentage must not be less than 75%;
    • The nature and the wages of the new jobs created;
    • The capital investment of the project; and
    • The potential for expansion or growth of the business or industry.

     

    Details of the economic incentive enhancements include:

    Incentives for Agriculture Operations

    •  Provides a tax credit program for agribusinesses that is mirrored after the Port Tax Credit Program.

    •  Allows an agribusiness operation or agricultural packaging operation that increases purchases that are certified as South Carolina grown by a minimum of 15% in a year to claim an income tax credit or employee withholding credit in an amount determined by the Coordinating Council.

    •  Products must be approved by the SC Dept. of Agriculture as Certified SC Grown.

    •  Maximum amount phased in over a four-year period:

    • 2017 – $500,000
    • 2018 – $1,000,000
    • 2019 – $1,500,000
    • 2020 – $2,000,000

    •  The Coordinating Council has sole discretion in allocating the credits.

    •  The base year total dollar purchases that are certified as South Carolina grown must exceed $100,000 for a taxpayer to be eligible.

    •  The tax credit sunsets after 10 years. It will need to be reauthorized through legislation if the General Assembly would like to continue the program.

    A taxpayer may not be awarded a tax credit under this program in excess of $100,000 in any tax year.

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    Greenville Health System and Palmetto Health will come together under a single brand in 2019 see more

    Greenville Health System and Palmetto Health will come together under a single brand, sharing a new name and logo, in early 2019.

    As part of the new identity, the GHS, Palmetto Health and Palmetto Health-USC Medical Group brands, including their names and logos, will be retired. GHS and Palmetto Health will share a new purpose statement as well, which will replace current mission, vision and values statements. In addition, the interim name of the parent company, SC Health Company, will be replaced with the new name.

    But much will remain the same:

    · Patient care will always be the top priority for the organization. Together, GHS and Palmetto Health will continue to improve clinical quality, access to care and the patient experience, while also addressing rising health care costs.

    · Both the affiliates will continue their unwavering commitment to the communities they’re privileged to serve. 

    · The organization’s commitment to transforming health care through education and research will not change. From educational and clinical research initiatives to collaborating with our academic partners, the organization remains strongly committed to academics. We will continue to focus on educating the next generation of medical providers and investing in clinical research to improve the lives of those we serve.

    The new company name and logo will begin replacing the GHS and Palmetto Health names and logos in early 2019. However, campus and hospital names will retain their core name identities. Legacy hospital identities like Baptist, Greenville Memorial, Laurens, Richland and Tuomey will be included in the new names.

    The Palmetto Health-USC Medical Group will change its name and logo in late 2019.

    Coming together under one brand is a reflection of how GHS and Palmetto Health are focused on working together to improve the health of all South Carolinians. Both affiliates will continue to connect teams, tools, technology and education in an effort to make a lasting impact in the communities each has served for generations.

    More information about the new brand identity, including the name, logo and purpose statement, will be announced Tuesday, Sept. 25.  

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    Lou Kennedy, CEO of Nephron Pharmaceuticals, will chair the SC Chamber of Commerce Board for 2018-19 see more

    The South Carolina Chamber of Commerce and the board have selected its newly elected officers and Board of Directors for 2018-2019. Leadership terms for the chamber’s officers and Board of Directors begin on October 1, 2018. Lou Kennedy will be the 2018 – 2019 Chairman.

    Lou Kennedy is President, Chief Executive Officer and owner of Nephron Pharmaceuticals Corporation. She joined Nephron Pharmaceuticals in 2001 and accepted the position of President and Chief Executive Officer in September 2007. Along with her husband Bill, Kennedy helped establish the Kennedy Pharmacy Innovation Center in conjunction with the USC School of Pharmacy. She serves on a variety of business and civic boards.

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    Clemson partnership extends reach to India and beyond see more

    Clemson University researchers said a new partnership with one of India’s top engineering universities will lead to new medical devices, sensors and startup companies, while helping educate leaders and entrepreneurs for the global healthcare industry.

    Clemson is joining with the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi to create the Center for Innovative Medical Devices and Sensors.

    The long-term vision for the center includes exchanges of faculty members, students and post-doctoral researchers, and to eventually establish joint courses. Some of the first projects will focus on solutions for diabetes and other chronic health issues common to both countries.

    The first exchanges could begin as soon as next summer.

    Researchers plan to focus on technology that is close to going from the lab to the marketplace, a concept that scholars call translational research. The devices that researchers develop could lead to biomedical start-ups — and the lucrative jobs that come with them– in South Carolina and India, they said.

    An advantage to cross-border research is that new technology will be designed to meet regulatory requirements in multiple countries, smoothing the transition to markets around the globe, said Delphine Dean, who is the Gregg-Graniteville Associate Professor of Bioengineering at Clemson.

    The collaboration is the latest in a growing number of links between South Carolina and India, a connection that could help build both economies, she said.

    “If a company wants to have a landing base to do FDA testing, South Carolina is a great area to do it in,” she said. “We have a lot of resources at the state level, and I think it will help drive economic development. When you go visit IIT Delhi, they know Clemson, and they know South Carolina.”

    Dean is coordinating the center with Sandeep K. Jha, an assistant professor in the Centre for Biomedical Engineering at IIT Delhi.

    Jha said the joint center with Clemson will be a win-win for both institutions and that they will develop several vital technologies by working together.

    “The research and continual development in the field of medical sensors and devices is the need of the hour,” he said.  “Most of the conventional technology related to healthcare and diagnostics have  gradually been shifted towards automation, miniaturization and cost-effectiveness.

    “In this regard, a research collaboration with Clemson University to develop cutting-edge medical technology would be beneficial for India, as it imports the majority of its medical devices and technologies. Medical devices and sensors could also help to meet several critical needs of South Carolina.”

    For Clemson students, the opportunity to visit labs and do research in India will encourage global-scale thinking.

    “If I were an undergrad, I’d think this was a great opportunity,” Dean said. “You go enjoy an experience in India and then you get your engineering degree. Then you’re a hot commodity for a job.”

    IIT Delhi students will be visiting Clemson primarily for research, graduate studies and specialized bioengineering programs. Those programs include the Master of Engineering program and Green MD, an initiative focused on medical device recycling and reprocessing.

    One of the attractions for IIT Delhi students is that they will have a chance to work with Clemson faculty who have extensive experience in translational research, said Brij Khorana, the chief scientific advisor for the College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences at Clemson.

    “By working with these Clemson faculty members, they will have the opportunity to gain entrepreneurial skills and participate in start-up businesses here, and then perhaps some of these students can go back to India and help with the healthcare industry there,” Khorana said. “Over time, this collaboration can just grow and grow.”

    Some of the students’ work will be on the main campus, and some will be in Greenville at the Clemson University Biomedical Engineering Innovation Campus. The campus, also called CUBEInC, is at Greenville Health System’s Patewood campus.

    Clemson’s close connection with clinicians at GHS and Medical University of South Carolina will be appealing to IIT Delhi students, Dean said. Clinicians play a crucial role in guiding research, ensuring that it reflects what happens in real-world hospitals and clinics.

    Martine LaBerge, chair of the Department of Bioengineering at Clemson, said the new center will create a unique environment for healthcare education and research.

    “The Center for Innovative Medical Devices and Sensors sets the stage for integrative learning and inventing experiences,” LaBerge said. “Students will learn the leadership, entrepreneurial and technical skills they will need to support and enhance a knowledge-based economy.”

    The collaboration between Clemson and IIT Delhi brings together two institutions noted for their work in engineering and healthcare.

    IIT Delhi was the third highest ranked Indian university in the latest QS World University Rankings. The institute also tied for No. 1 in engineering among Indian universities in the annual “Performance Ranking of Scientific Papers for World Universities” by National Taiwan University.

    Clemson is renowned as the birthplace of the field of biomaterials and was among the first universities in the United States to start a bioengineering program, awarding its first Ph.D. in 1963. The university played a central role in creating the Society for Biomaterials.

    Anand Gramopadhye, dean of Clemson’s College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences, said the center will enable transformative research and deepen the talent pool for the healthcare industry.

    “By coming together, Clemson and IIT Delhi will be able to accomplish much more than we could apart,” he said. “We are creating the conditions for a wider pipeline between academia and industry, as well as a healthier global society.”

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    The Greenwood Genetic Center has named Richard Steet, PhD as Director of Research see more

    GREENWOOD, South Carolina – The Greenwood Genetic Center has named Richard Steet, PhD as Director of Research and Head of the JC Self Research Institute. He joins the GGC faculty from the University of Georgia where he was Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in the University’s Complex Carbohydrate Research Center.

    Steet’s research program, which is funded by the NIH and private foundations, is focused on defining disease mechanisms for two different classes of inherited diseases - lysosomal storage disorders and congenital disorders of glycosylation. Dr. Steet is also a dedicated advocate of rare disease research and serves on the scientific advisory boards for the National MPS Society and ISMRD, two organizations that provide family support and advance research.

    “I am thrilled to become part of the world-renowned Greenwood Genetic Center, and I look forward to collaborating with their clinical and diagnostic divisions to enhance our understanding of the genetic basis for birth defects and disabilities,” said Steet.

    Steet’s additional goals for the Center’s Research Division include integrating the Center’s strengths in basic science research with clinical and translational studies. He also plans to enhance partnerships with pharmaceutical companies that can drive therapeutic development for genetic disorders.

    Steet and Heather Flanagan-Steet, PhD, who also joins GGC’s faculty as Director of Functional Studies and Director of the Center’s new Aquaculture Facility, study both cell and animal-based models of human disease. Their work uses a combination of chemical, molecular, and developmental approaches to unravel the complexity of these disorders and explore new ways to treat them. Their efforts will dovetail in many ways with the mission of the Clemson Center for Human Genetics, located adjacent to the JC Self Research Institute. 

    The Steets have been working with GGC over the past several months to set up a new aquaculture facility at the Center that, once fully operational, will house over 10,000 zebrafish. The facility, along with a new confocal microscope, which will arrive at GGC this fall, will allow in depth characterization of zebrafish models for several human genetic diseases. Their zebrafish and cell models will be further leveraged to study challenging cases seen in the clinic and diagnostic labs.

    “Zebrafish, who share approximately 70% of their genes with humans, are a powerful model organism for genetic disorders,” shared Flanagan-Steet. “Since zebrafish embryos are clear, we can observe their development from the very beginning and learn how genetic factors lead to the disease-associated features that we see in patients.”

    “GGC is fortunate to have the expertise of both Dr. Steet and Dr. Flanagan-Steet, and we are excited as our research program expands to include our first animal model,” said Steve Skinner, MD, Director of GGC. “The potential of this new area of study is tremendous, and what we learn through their lab will undoubtedly move us closer to developing effective treatments for patients with rare genetic disorders.”

    Steet assumes the directorship from Charles Schwartz, PhD who joined GGC in 1985 as the Director of the Center’s Molecular Laboratory, and shifted his focus to lead research initiatives in 1996. Schwartz earned an international reputation in the area of X-linked intellectual disability. He remains on GGC faculty as a Senior Research Scientist. 

  • Sam Patrick posted an article
    Medical device manufacturer launching new operations in the Upstate; life science boom continues see more

    Medical device manufacturer launching new operations in the Upstate

     

    Monday, October 16, 2017

    COLUMBIA, S.C. – Arthrex, Inc., a global orthopedic medical device company, headquartered in Naples, Fla., is launching new manufacturing operations in Anderson County. The $69 million capital investment is expected to create more than 1,000 new jobs over the next several years.

    With a corporate mission aimed at helping surgeons treat patients better, Arthrex is a leader in new product development and medical education in orthopedics. The company is a pioneer in the field of arthroscopy and has developed more than 11,000 innovative products and surgical procedures to advance minimally invasive orthopedics worldwide.

    Located at 5500 Highway 76 in Sandy Springs, S.C., Arthrex will be constructing a new 200,000-square-foot facility to manufacture its innovative orthopedic devices and implants. Hiring for the new positions should begin in the next 12 to 18 months, and interested applicants should visit the company’s careers page online(link is external).

    The Coordinating Council for Economic Development has approved job development credits related to this project.

    QUOTES

    “Arthrex is pleased to bring its innovative spirit and unique culture to Anderson County, S.C. and we look forward to leveraging the outstanding work done in the area to prepare future employees for high-level manufacturing jobs.” –Arthrex Vice President of Manufacturing Andy Owen

    “South Carolina’s business-friendly climate continues to attract companies in every industry, and we’re proud to welcome Arthrex, Inc. to our growing business community. This a milestone for Anderson County, and we can’t wait to see the difference these jobs will make in the region.” –Gov. Henry McMaster

    “Not only does our state excel in manufacturing, we’re also increasingly becoming a top choice for companies in the life sciences sector. Arthrex joins an impressive roster of life sciences firms that call South Carolina home, and we look forward to watching them grow in Anderson County for years to come.” –Secretary of Commerce Bobby Hitt

    “We are absolutely thrilled to begin our partnership with Arthrex. Their precision medical products are used by medical professionals around the globe, and the fact that our citizens have been chosen to make them says volumes about the quality of our workforce as well as the skills training we provide.” –Anderson County Council Chairman Tommy Dunn

    “This announcement takes our county in an exciting direction. Our goal of establishing a diverse economic base for our citizens is becoming a reality. The presence of this world-class company in our community speaks for who we are in Anderson, and we welcome them with open arms.” –Anderson County Councilman Tom Allen, District Four

    FIVE FAST FACTS

    • Arthrex is launching new manufacturing operations in Anderson County.
    • $69 million capital investment to create more than 1,000 new jobs.
    • Arthrex is a leading manufacturer of orthopedic medical devices.
    • Located at 5500 Highway 76 in Sandy Springs, S.C., the company will be constructing a new 200,000-square-foot facility to manufacture its innovative orthopedic devices and implants.
    • Hiring for the new positions should begin in the next 12 to 18 months, and interested applicants should visit the company’s careers page online